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  GRIN Taxonomy for Plants
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Taxon: Prunus virginiana L.

Genus: Prunus subgenus: Cerasus section: Laurocerasus
Family: Rosaceae subfamily: Amygdaloideae tribe: Amygdaleae.
Nomen number: 30151
Place of publication: Sp. pl. 1:473. 1753, nom. cons. prop.
Typification: View record from Linnaean Plant Name Typification Project of the Natural History Museum of London.
Comments:
  • a pending conservation proposal, if adopted, will preserve its current usage
  • proposed for conservation (nom. cons. prop.) with a conserved type (Melbourne ICN Art. 14.9)
Name verified on: 20-May-1992 by ARS Systematic Botanists. Last updated: 19-Sep-2014
Species priority site is: Natl. Germplasm Repository - Davis (DAV).
Accessions: 7 in National Plant Germplasm System.


See also subordinate taxa:


Common names:

  • bitter-berry   (Source: CRC MedHerbs ed2 ) – English
  • black chokecherry   (Source: Trees US ) – English   [Prunus virginiana var. demissa]
  • chokecherry   (Source: World Econ Pl ) – English
  • Virginia bird cherry   (Source: Zander Ency ) – English
  • western chokecherry   (Source: F NAmer ) – English   [Prunus virginiana var. demissa]
  • cerisier de Virginie   (Source: Dict Rehm ) – French
  • virginischer Traubenkirschbaum   (Source: Dict Rehm ) – German
  • cerezo de Virginia   (Source: Dict Rehm ) – Spanish
  • virginiahägg   (Source: Vara kulturvaxt namn ) – Swedish
More:

Economic importance:

  • Environmental: revegetator   (for land reclamation fide L. Gilbert, pers. comm. 1998, as P. virginiana melanocarpa)
  • Gene sources: potential for cold hardiness in sour cherry   (fide Acta Hort 190:141. 1990)
  • Materials: wood   (veneer fide AH 519)
  • Medicines: folklore   (fide CRC MedHerbs ed2; Herbs Commerce ed2)
  • Vertebrate poisons: mammals   (fide Kingsbury; Cooper & Johnson ed2)
More:

Distributional range:

      Native: (links to other web resources are provided for some distributions)
  • NORTHERN AMERICA (Check conservation status in U.S. & Canada in NatureServe Explorer database)
    Subarctic America: Canada - Northwest Territory [s.w.]
    Eastern Canada: Canada - New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec [s.]
    Western Canada: Canada - Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Saskatchewan
    Northeastern U.S.A.: United States - Connecticut, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont
    North-Central U.S.A.: United States - Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Wisconsin
    Northwestern U.S.A.: United States - Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, Wyoming
    Southeastern U.S.A.: United States - Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina [w.], Tennessee, Virginia
    South-Central U.S.A.: United States - New Mexico, Texas
    Southwestern U.S.A.: United States - Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah

References:

  • Aldén, B., S. Ryman & M. Hjertson. 2009. Våra kulturväxters namn - ursprung och användning. Formas, Stockholm (Handbook on Swedish cultivated and utility plants, their names and origin).
  • Aradhya, M. K. et al. 2004. Molecular characterization of variability and relationships among seven cultivated and selected wild species of Prunus L. using amplified fragment length polymorphism. Sci. Hort. 103:131–144.
  • Bortiri, E. et al. 2001. Phylogeny and systematics of Prunus (Rosaceae) as determined by sequence analysis of ITS and the chloroplast trnL-trnF spacer DNA. Syst. Bot. 26:797–807. [this study recognized this species as a member of subgenus Padus].
  • Bortiri, E. et al. 2006. Phylogenetic analysis of morphology in Prunus reveals extensive homoplasy. Pl. Syst. Evol. 259:53–71. [this study confirmed that Prunus virginiana is closer to members of Laurocerasus].
  • Cooper, M. R. & A. W. Johnson. 1998. Poisonous plants and fungi in Britain: animal and human poisoning. [poisonous].
  • Correll, D. S. & M. C. Johnston. 1970. Manual of the vascular plants of Texas.
  • Cronquist, A. et al. 1972–. Intermountain flora.
  • Duke, J. A. et al. 2002. CRC Handbook of medicinal herbs.
  • Erhardt, W. et al. 2008. Der große Zander: Enzyklopädie der Pflanzennamen.
  • Gandhi, K. N. et al. 2009. (1886-1887) Proposals to conserve the names Prunus serotina and P. virginiana (Rosaceae) with conserved types. Taxon 58:312–314.
  • Gilbert, L. 1998. pers. comm. [re. common names, as P. virginiana melanocarpa].
  • Gleason, H. A. & A. Cronquist. 1963. Manual of vascular plants of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada.
  • Hancock, J. F. et al. 2008. Chapter 9. Peaches. 265–298 In: Hancock, J. F., ed., Temperate fruit crop breeding: germplasm to genomics. 265–298. [this review cited Prunus virginiana among those species "that have been hybridized with P. persica"].
  • Hitchcock, C. L. et al. 1955–1969. Vascular plants of the Pacific Northwest.
  • IPGRI. New World Fruits Database (on-line resource).
  • Iezzoni, A. et al. 1990. Cherries (Prunus). Acta Hort. 190:111–173. [this review cited Prunus virginiana as one of the species tested for its frost resistance trait for sour cherry].
  • Kalinina, A. et al. 2007. Susceptibility of ornamental Prunus to plum pox potyvirus infection. Acta Hort. 738:601–605. [this study tested an ornamental cultivar of Prunus virginiana that was found to be partially resistant to the virus].
  • Kartesz, J. T. 1994. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. [with three varieties].
  • Kearney, T. H. & R. H. Peebles. 1969. Arizona flora, ed. 2.
  • Kingsbury, J. M. 1964. Poisonous plants of the United States and Canada. [poisonous].
  • Liberty Hyde Bailey Hortorium. 1976. Hortus third.
  • Little, E. L., Jr. 1978. Important forest trees of the United States.
  • Little, E. L., Jr. 1979. Checklist of United States trees, Agric. Handb. 541.
  • Martin, W. C. & C. R. Hutchins. 1980. A flora of New Mexico.
  • McGuffin, M., J. T. Kartesz, A. Y. Leung, & A. O. Tucker. 2000. Herbs of commerce, ed. 2.
  • Moss, E. H. & J. G. Packer. 1983. Flora of Alberta, ed. 2.
  • Munro, D. B. Canadian poisonous plants information system (on-line resource).
  • Porcher, M. H. et al. Searchable World Wide Web Multilingual Multiscript Plant Name Database (MMPND) (on-line resource).
  • Porsild, A. E. & W. J. Cody. 1980. Vascular plants of continental Northwest Territories, Canada.
  • Radford, A. E. et al. 1964. Manual of the vascular flora of the Carolinas.
  • Rehm, S. 1994. Multilingual dictionary of agronomic plants.
  • Rohrer, J. R. 2011. Prunus (Rosaceae). 9: in press In: FNA Editorial Committee, Flora of North America. 9: in press.
  • Scoggan, H. J. 1978–1979. The flora of Canada, 4 vol.
  • Steyermark, J. A. 1977. Flora of Missouri.
  • Tutin, T. G. et al., eds. 1964–1980. Flora europaea.
  • Walters, S. M. et al., eds. 1986–. European garden flora.
More:

Synonyms:


Check other web resources for Prunus virginiana L.:


Images:

More:
  • Check PlantSystematics.org for additional images
  • Google Images Images Note: Be advised that their identity may be inaccurate. Proper identification of a plant may require specialized taxonomic knowledge or comparison with properly documented herbarium material.

Abbreviations & symbols in GRIN Taxonomy

| USDA | ARS | GRIN | NPGS | New Search |

Cite as:
USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program.
Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN) [Online Database].
National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland.
URL: http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?30151 (21 September 2014)

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